Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Windows’

Combining PowerShell Cmdlet Results

April 17, 2012 19 comments

In my last post I used used New-Object to create an desirable output when the “Get-Mailbox” cmdlet didn’t meet my needs.  If your eyes glazed over trying to read the script, let me make it a bit simpler by focusing on a straight forward example.

Say you need to create a list of user’s mailbox size with their email address.  This sounds like a simple request, but what you’d soon find is that mailbox sizes are returned with the Get-MailboxStatistics cmdlet and the email address is not.  For that, you need to use another cmdlet, such as Get-Mailbox.

With the New-Object cmdlet, we are able to make a custom output that contains data from essentially wherever we want.

See this example:

$MyObject = New-Object PSObject -Property @{
EmailAddress = $null
MailboxSize = $null
}

In this example, I have created a new object with 2 fields, and saved it as the $MyObject variable.

For now, we’ve set the data to null, as shown below:

$MyObject

The next step is to populate each of those fields.  We can write to them one at a time with lines like this:

$MyObject.EmailAddress = (Get-Mailbox mcrowley).PrimarySmtpAddress
$MyObject.MailboxSize = (Get-MailboxStatistics mcrowley).TotalItemSize

Note: The variable we want to populate is on the left, with what we want to put in it on the right.

To confirm our results, we can simply type the variable name at the prompt:

$MyObject with data

Pretty cool, huh?

Ok, so now about that list.  My example only shows the data for mcrowley, and you probably need more than just 1 item in your report, right?

For this, you need to use the foreach loop.  You can read more about foreach here, but the actual code for our list is as follows:

(I am actually going to skip the $null attribute step here)

$UserList = Get-mailbox -Resultsize unlimited
$MasterList = @()
foreach ($User in $UserList) {
$MyObject = New-Object PSObject -Property @{
EmailAddress = (Get-Mailbox $User).PrimarySmtpAddress
MailboxSize = (Get-MailboxStatistics $User).TotalItemSize
}
$MasterList += $MyObject
}
$MasterList

$MasterList with data

Finally, if you wanted to make this run faster, we really don’t need to run “get-mailbox” twice.  For better results, replace the line:

EmailAddress = (Get-Mailbox $User).PrimarySmtpAddress

With this one:

EmailAddress = $User.PrimarySmtpAddress

Security Flaw in Remote Desktop

March 13, 2012 1 comment

3/16/2012 UPDATE:

Exploit code published for RDP worm hole

————————————-

I don’t always post on Windows security updates, but when I do, it’s a Dos Equis near to my heart!  Do you use Remote Desktop?  Of course you do.  That’s why you need to install this update immediately:

MS12-020: Vulnerabilities in Remote Desktop could allow remote code execution

This is important for anyone running just about any version of Windows, but especially if you’ve got any machine exposing Remote Desktop directly to the internet (such as a Terminal Server).  Fortunately there is a mitigation for those who just cannot patch tonight: enable NLA for your Remote Desktop connections.RDP - Network Level Authentication

Read more here.

Hop to it!  Microsoft says not to wait for a normal patch-cycle on this one…

RSAT for Windows 7 with Service Pack 1 (SP1)

Until now, there were no Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT) available for Windows 7 SP1.

Microsoft released an updated version today which adds this support.  You can download it here:

Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 7 with Service Pack 1 (SP1)

Updated Hyper-V Component Architecture Diagram

February 21, 2011 Leave a comment

Microsoft has released another great poster; this time for the new Hyper-V architecture within Windows 2008 R2 Service Pack 1.

You can download it by clicking here:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=93C814D0-FE4B-4D5B-B280-1B9807EC9933&displaylang=en

 

How to Set Windows 7’s Login Wallpaper with Group Policies

February 17, 2011 32 comments
With Windows XP, you could set your own login background colors and/or wallpaper by modifying the values found in the following registry location: [HKEY_USERS\.DEFAULT\Control Panel\Desktop].
Windows 7 no longer reads this registry key.  Instead you’ve got to complete the multi-step process described in this article.
Login Background for Windows XP
While the steps to set a login wallpaper are not complicated, one challenging limitation is the fact your background wallpaper needs to reside on the workstation’s hard drive.  Interestingly, this is not true for the user’s wallpaper, as there are GPO settings to point to a network location.
So when I had a customer ask me to set their login wallpaper, I had to think of how I wanted to accomplish their request.  We could possibly write a script, and as much “fun” as that might be, I’d rather use something more controlled.  Something that would allow me to easily change the configuration later as well as be decipherable to the customer after I leave.
The answer?  Group Policy – Preferences, that is!
So before we jump in to the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC), let’s identify what we’re trying to do.  If you haven’t already, you may wish to read the above link, otherwise you’re about to be lost.
We want our policy to:
  1. Copy our wallpaper file to the user’s workstation.
  2. Instruct Windows to use our file instead of the default %WinDir%\System32\oobe\background.bmp file.
With the new (ok they aren’t that new anymore) Group Policy Preferences that Windows 7 has built-in, we can copy our wallpaper to the user’s computer, while reserving the right to pull it off if the computer leaves the scope of the GPO.  To copy files, open GPMC and follow these steps:
1. Navigate to: Computer Configuration\Preferences\Windows Settings\Files clip_image001
2. Right-click the “Files” node and select:

New > File
clip_image002
3. Select Replace

4. Type in the UNC path for your source file.
     •In my example I used:
\\Srv1\Share\CompanyLogo.jpg
     •Remember this file needs to be <256K
     •Also understand the permissions on this share need to allow the workstation’s computer account READ. If you leave the usual “Authenticated Users” you’ll be fine.
5. For the Destination File, type this exact text (without the quotes, and no line breaks):
“%windir%\system32\oobe\info\backgrounds\backgrounddefault.jpg
clip_image003
6. Click the “Common” tab

7. Select “Remove this item when it is no longer applied”. This will ensure your file is removed if:
     •The GPO is deleted or disabled
     •The workstation is moved to another OU where the policy is not linked
     •The policy is filtered out
     •You update your policy to send a new wallpaper file
clip_image004
8. Optionally: Select Item-level targeting to specify only Windows 7 computers. This will ensure your file isn’t sent to versions of Windows that wouldn’t make use of it anyway. clip_image005
Now we need to instruct Windows to render this image when the login screen is displayed.  If you read the above article, you’ll remember the OEMBackground registry key.  The good news is, we don’t need that key because there is actually a setting to enable it in GPMC already.
In the same Group Policy Object, navigate to:
Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\System\Logon.
Once there, select “Always use custom logon background” and set it to “Enabled”.  This has the same effect of setting the registry manually.
image
Once you’ve completed these steps, close the Group Policy Management Editor and link your policy to an OU – you’re done!
This policy may take two refresh cycles (e.g. reboots) to take effect.  This is because the wallpaper file is not yet present when the “always use custom logon background” setting is first applied.  But once the file has completed copying you’ll see your image at logon.
If you would like to consider multiple screen resolutions, please consult this link.
Before we close, I should point out, this can work for Server 2008 R2 as well.  I have not tested with Vista or Server 2008.
Finally, here are some geeky, but not too over the top wallpapers:  Smile
Login Background for Windows 7

Service Pack 1 for Windows 2008 R2 Now Available for Download

February 16, 2011 1 comment

Just a quick note to remind everyone that Service Pack 1 for Windows 7 and Windows 2008 R2 has just now become available for download on TechNet & MSDN.

If you don’t have a TechNet or MSDN subscription you should see it on the Microsoft Download sites next Tuesday. [EDIT: Here is the download Link]

Be sure to check with each product group before installing this.  Obviously it is supported with the OS itself (clustering, Hyper-V, RDS, etc) but you should seek a direct support statement like the one the Exchange group published.

You should also validate your 3rd party applications.  You’ll note there may be some issues with VMware, for example…

For more information such as release notes or articles on what’s new, visit this page:

Windows Server 2008 R2 Service Pack 1

Finally, here is a screenshot:

Version    6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601

Version    6.1.7601 Service Pack 1 Build 7601

Remote Desktop Services Component Architecture Poster

August 24, 2010 Leave a comment

Remote Desktop Services (formally Terminal Services) has dramatically improved and matured starting with the Windows 2008 launch.  In many ways, it allows Citrix installations to be replaced by native Windows technologies.

You can read more here: http://microsoft.com/rds

This week Microsoft released a very nice diagram/poster of the technology.  Check it out here:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=9BC943B7-07C5-4335-9DF9-20E77ED5032E&displaylang=en 

image

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 62 other followers